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eTravel S.A. - Our company administers the largest hotel reservation systems in Poland. We are one of the largest operators of hotel services in Poland and thanks to this we are able to offer you hotel accommodation at discounts of up to 55% of the normal hotel rates. Our reservation systems, such as TravelPoland.com, make hundreds of bookings for individual and especially corporate clients.

TravelPoland.com - is a most innovative reservation system in Poland. Bookings online. Hotels in Warsaw, hotels in Krakow (Cracow), Hotels in Gdansk, Hotels in Poznan and many other cities. Secure and safe transactions with eCard. Company services and group bookings. Automatic booking confirmation. The largest hotel database in Poland. Over 900 hotels online. The most certain and solid tourism operator – over 10 years of experience. Form 2002 to 2009 we had the most amount of hotel reservations in Poland.
Warsaw in XXIst century
About 5 million foreign tourists spent at least one night in Warsaw last year. The largest group were visitors from the former Soviet Union and Germany. Thanks to Warsaw`s unique role as the political, commercial, academic and cultural capital of Poland, the dominant group of visitors are businessmen, politicians, scientists and artists. A large number of foreign visitors, those from the East, come to the city to buy and sell goods, while another important group of tourists, mainly from Western Europe, visits Warsaw for pleasure, while on holiday. It is estimated that tourists from abroad spend total of 1 billion dollars annually in Warsaw.
Visitors arriving in Warsaw have at their disposal the following variety of accommodations: 34 hotels, four youth hostels, four campsites and four open camping fields. The hotels can accommodate a total of 16,500 visitors. Most hotels and other types of accommodation are grouped in the centre of the city. Significantly, there is a growing number of hotels in the vicinity of main roads linking Warsaw with other cities and regions. Although the number of hotels is growing with each year, there is still a shortage of two- or three-star facilities in Warsaw.

Warsaw has a booming economy almost free of unemployment. It offers an attractive business environment with a full range of modern business services and well-trained professionals familiar with Western standards.
It is the financial centre of this part of Europe and an important consumer market. It has become the focal point of foreign investments and a driving force in the development of the entire country's economy.

Over 244,000 companies are registered here - 98,5 percent of them private.

Warsaw holds first place nation-wide in terms of percentage of companies with foreign capital registred. By the end of 1999 there were 13,152 such companies, i.e. over 30 percent of the total in Poland. Among them, most (44 percent) are active in retail, 23 percent in banking and finance with other services for business development, and 12 percent in manufacturing.

One great of advantage of Warsaw is its labour market. Twenty percent of Warsaw's population boasts a university degree.The unemployment rate is the lowest in Poland (5,1 percent). Warsaw`s job market attracts the most promising youngsters from all over Poland. Over 244,000 companies are registered here - 98,5 percent of them private.

Warsaw holds first place nation-wide in terms of percentage of companies with foreign capital registred. By the end of 1999 there were 13,152 such companies, i.e. over 30 percent of the total in Poland. Among them, most (44 percent) are active in retail, 23 percent in banking and finance with other services for business development, and 12 percent in manufacturing.

One great of advantage of Warsaw is its labour market. Twenty percent of Warsaw's population boasts a university degree.The unemployment rate is the lowest in Poland (5,1 percent). Warsaw`s job market attracts the most promising youngsters from all over Poland.

Today's Warsaw is a city of contrasts. Its skyline teems with high-rise office buildings and hotels. Flickering bright neon lights of clubs, pubs and restaurants attract one's eyes. The furious pace of life makes your head reel. But it must be said that Warsaw is also a place of ancient churches, fine palaces and parks, also cemeteries, old tenement buildings and quiet mews. Warsaw defies simple definitions.

The city's character has been shaped by its rich history. The first mention of a settlement dates back to the 10th century, but it was only in 1596 that King Zygmunt III Vaza decided to shift the national capital from Cracow. The city experienced rapid expansion in the mid-18th century during the reign of Poland's last monarch King Stanisław August Poniatowski. That was when many of Warsaw's most charming parks, palaces and churches appeared. In the twenty inter-war years, following 123 years of Poland's foreign subjugation, Warsaw once again became one of Europe's most important capital cities.

That period of prosperity was interrupted by the Second World War during which the city was almost entirely destroyed. Following the war, Warsaw was reconstructed in a most chaotic manner but even so the city succeeded in regaining many old architectural objects. A period of further change occurred when the previous system was overturned in 1989. The last decade has been a period of rapid growth, with Warsaw city changing at a mind-reeling pace. New buildings, streets and even whole districts have appeared.

Warsaw is where Poland's political and cultural life is focussed. The Lower House of Parliament (Sejm) and the Senate are situated here, together with many major cultural institutions, museums, art galleries and theatres. Events of world-wide repute take place in Warsaw: the Mozart Festival, Warsaw Summer Jazz Days, Jazz Jamboree, Warsaw International Film Festival and also the International Frederic Chopin Piano Competition held every five years. Warsaw is also a major financial and industrial centre moving in tandem with other capitals of Europe. Its central geographical location makes the Polish capital an excellent point from which most large Polish towns can easily be reached, a fact which favours the growth of its economy.
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